CUNY New York City College of Technology in Brooklyn

Brooklyn, NY

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Overview

CUNY New York City College of Technology offers 171-degree programs. Student-to-faculty ratio is 17:1. 1 high safety campus. Acceptance Rate is 73%. 54.9% are women, and 45.1% are men. 5% percents of international students. CUNY New York City College of Technology is a member of 4 athletic associations. The average annual total cost of attendance at CUNY New York City College of Technology is 6941$, that is at the level of national average. 15% of full-time CUNY New York City College of Technology students completed their education in 150 percent of time: graduation rate is at the level of national average. Average salary after attending is $37,500, so if you studied 2 years, you’ll get your funds back in less than 2 years.

Average Annual Cost

Average annual cost includes tuition and fees, books and supplies, and living expenses, minus the average grant/scholarship aid. Separate metrics have calculated for different institutions depends on calendar system and sector of the establishment (public or private).

The CUNY New York City College of Technology is a public and non-academic-year institution, so it’s net price represents an average of all programs and includes only undergraduates who first enrolled in the fall term and pay in-state tuition and receive Title IV aid.

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$6,941
BELOW AVERAGE

By Family Income

Depending on the federal state, or institutional grant and available, CUNY New York City College of Technology students in your income bracket may pay more of less than the overall average costs.

Family IncomeAverage cost
$0 - $30,000$5,824
$30,001 - $48,000$7,501
$48,001 - $75,000$11,267
$75,001 - $110,000$14,113
$110,001+$14,337

Admission considerations

Required:

  • Secondary school GPA
  • Secondary school record
  • Other Test (Wonderlic, WISC-III, etc.)

Recommended:

  • Admission test scores

Neither required nor recommended:

  • Secondary school rank
  • Completion of college-preparatory program
  • Recommendations
  • Formal demonstration of competencies
  • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)

Finance

Charges:

  • Typical room charge for academic year: -

  • Typical board charge for academic year: -

  • Combined charge for room and board: -

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Percent of students with financial aid

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18%

Types of financial aids

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10820 of CUNY New York City College of Technology undergraduate students were awarded with some type of financial aid, it’s 62 percents of all undergraduate students. This makes CUNY New York City College of Technology number 22 in the amount of financial aid awarded to students among all educational institutions in New York.

Students at CUNY New York City College of Technology awarded 5 types of loans or aids, the biggest percent of students received a any financial aid.

Family IncomeNumber awarded grant and scholarship aidAverage amount of grant and scholarship aid awarded
$0 - $30,000
100%
$9,279
$30,001 - $48,000
100%
$7,320
$48,001 - $75,000
98.6%
$3,859
$75,001 - $110,000
75.47%
$881
$110,001+
16.67%
$138

Salary After Attending

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$37,500

According to College Scorecard Data from U.S. Department of Education

Students services

Career

Academic/career counseling service

Employment services for students

Living & meal

Full-time, first-time degree/certificate-seeking students required to live on campus

Institution provide on-campus housing

Institution provides board or meal plan

Veteran Services Available

Credit for military training

Dedicated point of contact for support services for veterans, military servicemembers, and their families

Recognized student veteran organization

Disability services

3%

Percent indicator of undergraduates formally registered as students with disabilities

Undergraduate programs or courses are offered via distance education

Alternative tuition plans

Any alternative tuition plans offered by institution

Prepaid tuition plan

Tuition payment plan

Prepaid tuition plan - a program that allows students or their families to purchase college tuition or tuition credits for future years, at current prices.

Tuition payment plan - a program that allows tuition to be paid in installments spread out over an agreed upon period of time, sometimes without interest or finance charges.

Special learning opportunities

Here are the learning opportunities available in CUNY New York City College of Technology.

Study abroad

Weekend/evening college

Teacher certification (below the postsecondary level)

Teacher certification: students can complete their preparation in certain areas of specialization

Teacher certification: approved by the state for initial certification or licensure of teachers

Study abroad - programs and arrangements offering students a possibility to complete part of the college program studying in another country.

Weekend/evening college allows students to complete courses and attend classes only on weekends or only in evenings.

Teacher certifications programs are designed to prepare students to meet the requirements for certification as teachers in elementary, middle/junior high, and secondary schools.

Athletic associations

  • Member of National Athletic Association
  • Member of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)
  • NCAA/NAIA member for basketball
  • NCAA/NAIA member for cross country/track

Graduation Rate

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15%
BELOW AVERAGE

CUNY New York City College of Technology graduation rate is below the national average.

15% of full-time students enrolled for the first time to CUNY New York City College of Technology completed the education program and got a degree in 150 percent of the expected time of completion.

The graduation rate value includes only programs that were completed less than six years for four-year degrees or less than three years for two-year degrees.

Graduation rate is the percentage of institution’s new-entering, first-time, first-year undergraduate students who complete their program within 150% of the published time for the program. Graduation rate excludes an extensive number of students. This index doesn’t consider students of nontraditional enrollments - part-time students, students who enroll mid-year, and who transfer from one institution to another. So graduation rate alone can create a misleading perception. Completion rate in the form of total number of students receiving any types of awards/degrees creates a complete picture. Combining this data with graduation rate is a better way to compare educational institutions.

Applying information

Average number of admissions to one applicant

1 : 1

Average number of applicants to one enrolled

5 : 1

Admission considerations

Required:

  • Secondary school GPA
  • Secondary school record
  • Other Test (Wonderlic, WISC-III, etc.)

Recommended:

  • Admission test scores

Neither required nor recommended:

  • Secondary school rank
  • Completion of college-preparatory program
  • Recommendations
  • Formal demonstration of competencies
  • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)

Acceptance Rate

The percentage of students given offers out of all those that applied.

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73%

In comparison to National Average

CUNY New York City College of Technology acceptance rate is above national average.

In comparison to state Average

Average acceptance rate for institutions in state is 67%, so acceptance rate value is above state average for 6%.

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73%
ABOVE AVERAGE

In comparison to an average acceptance rate in of colleges in $0 - $10k price range

Average acceptance rate for all institutions in state in the same net price range is 71%, so CUNY New York City College of Technology acceptance rate value is above state net price average for 2% only.

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73%
ABOVE AVERAGE

Admissions yield

Of those that receive offers to enroll, this is the percent of students that actually do enroll. It is equal to the number of students that enroll divided by the number of accepted students multiplied by 100.
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26%

Total

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25%

Full time

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2%

Part time

Retention rate

Full-time retention rate

76%

Part-time retention rate

78%

The CUNY New York City College of Technology full-time retention rate is 76% and part-time retention rate is 78%.

Retention rate is the percentage of the institution's first-time first-year undergraduate students who continue at that institution the next year. E.g., full-time students who study in the fall semester and continue studying in the same program next fall semester are included in the retention rate.

Retention rate is an important indicator: if it is high, it shows that school has quality curriculum, welcoming student environments and cultures as more students choose to continue their studies.

Student Body

The student-to-faculty ratio at CUNY New York City College of Technology is 17:1, that means that for every 17 students the institution has one professor, lecturer or specialist with a degree in education. Lower student-to-faculty ratio is better - it means that professors can dedicate more time and attention to each student.

Student-to-faculty ratio

17:1
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Men/Women

Number of international students

981
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5%

Percent of international students

Race/ethnicity breakdown

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Students enrollment in distance education

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In CUNY New York City College of Technology the biggest percent of students are enrolled in on-campus courses.

Distance education location breakdown

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Here are the students enrolled exclusively in distance education courses at CUNY New York City College of Technology and grouped by their location. Distance education courses are the most popular for students located in not reported location.

Campus Safety

The percentage of crimes on Main Campus

The campus located by 300 Jay St address in Brooklyn, New York.

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Main Campus in comparison of all branches in the US. It is calculated as the average percent of crimes yearly by five years of data for every campus, based on an overall number of students studying there. The branch is a part of CUNY New York City College of Technology with 0.04% of maximum crimes a year. The most often crimes detected on Main Campus are burglary and forcible sex offense.

Academic Programs

Number of degree programs offered

CUNY New York City College of Technology offers 171 programs in total: 81 are for Associate's degree, 63 - for Bachelor's degree, 15 - for less than 1-year certificate programs, and 12 are 1-year, but less than-2-year certificate programs.

This is the middle number of programs in comparison with other 53 universities in Kings county, with one of the highest number of Associate's degree and 1-year, but less than-2-year certificate programs offered. CUNY New York City College of Technology is one of the few institutions in Kings that offers a Bachelor's degree program.

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Total credit/contact hours

Here you can find the data on instructional activity in measured in total credit and/or contact hours delivered by institutions during a 12-month period. Also we shown the New York state average data to help you compare.

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CUNY New York City College of Technology provides coursework for undergraduate students оnly.

In 2014-2015 academic year estimated full-time equivalent undergraduate enrollment was 12538 students with 376136 сredit hours for 12-month instructional activity period.

Photos

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Photo by Jose Lopez

Photo by NYC ENT Yoshe BK

Photo by Dalvin Mendez

Photo by Christian Torres

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Photo by Francisco Betances

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Student Reviews and Ratings for CUNY New York City College of Technology

Overall Rating:

Overall Rating:

WARNING! YOU PROBABLY WILL NOT LIKE THIS SCHOOL IF YOU WANT TO PURSUE A CAREER IN THE ARTS.Every professor I've had outside of the design dept. Is grossly unprepared. I've had a math teacher who teaches his hour long quantitative reasoning class with only short math tutorials from Youtube. The class contained over 30 students and It was impossible to get individual attention. Instead of helping the class, the teacher flirted with girls and talked about how he'd rather be home watching Jerry Springer. This was an early 9:30 am class and I could have stayed home instead since he never engaged the class or entertained any questions. If we did not understand we were told to go see a tutor in the Midway building, a small building City Tech uses to hold classes outside of the main building. The tutor room is always overcapacity with too many students you can barely ever get enough individual attention. I received a low grade in this class having not been in school for a while and I forgot most of the math I learned in high school. Lazy, careless teachers like this are all over City Tech. Of course I've enrolled in classes with teachers who cared about doing a good job but the amount of under performing faculty is too note worthy.I major in communication design. I went to city tech to gain enough credits to be eligible to transfer to the Fashion Institute of Technology where I major in Computer Animation. Having graduated from a vocational magnet school, the High School of Art and Design, then attending the School of Visual Arts, I know what a good art program looks like. City Tech's design department is good for helping students figure out what they want to do in the art world, then go do it at a better school. The New York City College of Technology has a competent design department to say the very least but it is not very impressive mostly due to the mediocrity I see in so many of my class mates. There is no auditioning required for this major so the school sucks up all the riff-raff of undecided young who couldn't get into real art schools. The instructors accept their mediocrity without challenging students to up their ante. The large amount of inexperienced students coming from average high schools with little or no art programs makes for a dull talent pool. Most of the students in the COMD department are just looking to test the waters and be introduced to the field. Every art class I enrolled in made me feel like a big fish in a small pond. Teachers gave me a break on numerous occasions because I knew the material so well there was nothing to teach me. I actually ended up teaching some of the teachers and embarrassing them in front of everyone. I learned nothing new except for what I learned in a 3d animation class. Which is a senior class. I entered City Tech with 40 credits. Normally I would have to take many prerequisite classes before I can take this class but since I already took a 3D class at a different college, I was given permission to enroll. In other words, I was only able to take this class, which is geared towards learning what I actually want to do for a living, because I cleverly exploited a loophole. Everyone else who wants to be a cartoonist, animator, or Illustrator has to take 2-3 years of classes mostly focusing on design. Boring (If this is already your forte).If you are talented and have high hopes and ambitions for your artistic career, do not go to City Tech. If you are 100% sure of what you want to do with your talent professionally and have the grades to go elsewhere, do not go to City Tech. If you want to seriously improve your skill, do not go to City Tech. If you want to study one thing, like illustration, animation, fine art, film, photography, and study it to the max, DO NOT GO TO CITY TECH. It will slow you down with rudimentary courses before you can get serious with you Major's focus.Don't waste your time with this school if you are serious about your art career. Audition for a college that has more specialized art departments, like FIT, SVA, RISD, Cal Arts, SCAD, NYU etc.

Source of the review: Google Places, Google Maps™

Overall Rating:

If you want to learn nothing, this is the college for you. Many but certainly not all professors there are arrogant. They look down at the students attending their college. The staff will give you classes carelessly.They don't care if you learn anything with the schedule they gave you. They can have an EE major taking an art class but missing a math class on their schedule,Or CS major taking chinese class instead of a math class. If you are smart, avoid attending this college at all cost. You will waste your money and time otherwise. They don't expect their student to learn much either. They force you to take elementary classes despite you have shown them the proof of mastery of elementary concepts. They also break their promise like nothing when ever they have excuse. They penalize people for the sake of giving penalty despite wasting their time. A bunch of jerks will rips you off if you don't obey them like a nerd. . Definitely the worst place to learn anything. But perhaps a nice place to waste time and sit through.

Source of the review: Google Places, Google Maps™

Overall Rating:

My acceptance into the "Medical Laboratory Program", was almost put to a halt corresponding to the bias opinion of a female professor from India. My placement into this program was contingent on my grades. A white male professor reviewing my grades said; " It seems you have the prerequisites and the grades to gain acceptance in this program. BUT.... A comment clearly expressed from this Indian professor was; " You can't let him into this program!" And he said; " He has the grades and prerequisites." I can't see why I can't accept him into the program. ". She then added, " He can't be accepted into this program because he's.... Do you know what high school he graduated from? We have students from prestigious and reputable high schools and they don't make it. What makes you think he'll make it into this program!" His remark then was, I can't deny him entry when he has the entry qualifications. Her final remark was; " then it is up to you." His face was reddened and he clearly expressed embarrassment with her remark of...." he can't be accepted into this program because he's...... ". Must admit, the program was tough....but this Puerto Rican descendant made it too, in spite of, " because he's.... " A continuation: after graduation from this program, my 1st employment's salary was $5.35 cents an hour. If I would have elected to work in house keeping, my salary would have been $6.00 dollars an hour. I got a scholarship to attend NYU Medical Center. My salary before I retired was six figures. Moral? The university and the program must B a carefully, well thought-out choice. Because ultimately, the final choice is always yours!!! Continuation 2: A student objected to the extreme difficulty of this program. He said; the nursing program is less demanding and the pay is better. The professor's response: You would look real nice in a nurse uniform. Also added: This is a institution of higher education, not a institution to get a job!! Moral: There is never justification in defending a program's extreme difficulty by utilizing negative and destructive reasons, that undermines a student's genuine concern in succeeding in a program, with the lack of compassion and understanding to the student. This is clear notice to you, to leave this institution and program.

Source of the review: Google Places, Google Maps™

Overall Rating:

True, the office part of this school sucks big time. People that work there are burnt and do not feel like seeing anyone that approaches them. They do forget that we do not do what they do and there is no explanations to the dry requests they throw at you. When I registered I had to go home and come back for three different documents. Granted, we should read the requested list before getting there, but if we did everything why would we need paper pushers? Once you are registered, admitted, and settled in the field of your choice (also lucky enough to not have to go back to the offices ever again) you're up for smooth sailing. Just like most schools. this one has a hand full of dedicated and aspiring professors as well as some lazy, ignorant a--holes, that stopped trying and stopped perfecting their craft once they got PhD attached to their names. The computer field is the most noteworthy field in this school, just like economics is to Baruch or law is to John Jay. Other fields wouldn't be that much recognized (hopefully things have changed in the last 2 years). Cleanliness in the place isn't that bad, considering there are 1000 unruly pigs roaming the premises at all times.

Source of the review: Google Places, Google Maps™

Overall Rating:

I have spent some of the most memorable moments of my life here! Made so many new friends, and some more people that I disliked! Earned my degree in Comp Sci here! Great and caring professors, guidance counselors here! I have had both Negative and positive experiences here! This place will forever be etched in mind!

Source of the review: Google Places, Google Maps™

Location & Website

Address: 300 Jay St

Place:

Religious affiliation: Not applicable

Calendar system: Semester

General Phone Number: +7182605500

Institution is active in current year: 1

Institution's internet website address: citytech.cuny.edu

Financial aid office: Go to the page

Admissions office: Go to the page

Online application: Go to the page

Net price calculator: Go to the page

Veterans and Military Service members tuition policies: Go to the page

Student-Right-to-Know student athlete graduation rate: Go to the page

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